Tech industry gets a makeover – or is it makeup receiving an update | MAKEUPANDTHECITY

What's up makeupandthecity,

I'm really sorry for my absence lately I don't really have a reason for it as of now other then how can I possibly influence and inform you(s) when I'm not doing so well, if I was to see myself right now, I wouldn't even recognize myself. Maybe it's the season change that's got me down, or just even more of a realization that time is the ultimate killer.

Is it just me or are beauty products starting to look less like regular pots of cream with tamper-proof packaging – and more like something that should come with a two-year manufacturing warranty? It's almost crazy to me to see how much of the beauty industry is now run by a technical component.

We now have a mirror that checks your skin for any wrinkles, dark circles or blemishes, before making product recommendations based on its analysis. It stores the data for future use which only you can access after “logging in” using your face as the passcode. So if you’ve started using a new skincare product and want to see if there are any noticeable changes after a few weeks, you can pull up previous data (via your smartphone or the mirror itself) to check for signs of progress. The point is, it leads to actionable changes – whether that means switching to a new routine or continuing with your favourite products – based onevidence, not what you think might have happened.

L’Oréal Group is aggressively investing in innovating hi-tech beauty products through its Technology Incubator. This incubatorconcentrates solely on technological innovation.

The company has unveiled a string of products through different brands: My UV Patch by skincare brand La Roche-Posay; Le Teint Particulier Custom Made Makeup by cosmetics brand Lancôme; and a smartbrush produced with Kérastase, a hair-care brand, and Withings, a consumer electronics company that falls under Nokia.

Kinda crazy to think about don't you think? My UV Patch, resembles the look and feel of a non-permanent sticker tattoo – a symbol of our childhood youth – which can adhere to and stretch to match the movement of your skin. It’s just 50 micrometres thick, about half the thickness of an average strand of human hair. The patch uses photosensitive dyes that change colour according to the level of UV rays it is exposed to, which you can take a photo of and upload to an app to find out how much sun you’ve been getting.

By now we should all know just how dangerous that lovely sun exposure is doing, actually, is hurting your skin.

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